Source

Albert E. Flanagan architectural drawings and art

Title
Albert E. Flanagan architectural drawings and art, 1913-1950.
Description
39 prints ; 32 drawings ; 11 photographs ; 1 printed article ; 1 sketchbook : (1 print box)
Abstract
This collection includes examples of Flanagan's architectural renderings, most done for other architects. Projects include an imaginary cityscape; the Hotel Majestic (unidentified location) ; the Marble Hill Houses for the New York City Housing Authority, designed by John Ambrose Thompson; a competition entry for the Masonic Temple and Scottish Rite Cathedral in Scranton, Pa.; the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., designed by Harry St. Clair Zogbaum ; the projected restoration of King Solomon's Temple and Citadel, published in PENCIL POINTS in 1925 and shown at the Philadelphia Sesqui-Centennial International Exposition, for architects Helmle and Corbett and archeologist John Wesley Kelchner ; and an unidentified wall and ceiling design. As well, this collection includes many examples of Flanagan's fine art drawings and etchings, including landscapes, cityscapes, travel sketches, and figure studies. Sites depicted include New York City, Nantucket (Mass.), England, France, Holland, and Venice. A small group of architectural drawings of the classical orders, perhaps done by Flanagan while he was teaching in the School of Architecture at Columbia University, completes the collection.
Summary
New York City architectural renderer, artist, and printmaker. Born 1884 in Newark, New Jersey, Flanagan graduated from the School of Architecture at Columbia University in 1910. Flanagan taught drawing at Columbia from 1911 to 1912 and returned as an associate professor of design from 1920 to 1925. Flanagan also worked for several architectural firms, often as a renderer, including Trowbridge & Livingston, McKim, Mead & White, and Harvey Corbett. In 1927, Flanagan left Corbett's office and began full time work as a fine artist. From January 1928 until August 1929, Flanagan travelled in Europe, studying with painter Edouard Léon Cortès in Paris from the fall of 1928 through the spring of 1929. Flanagan was also one of the original members of the Society of American Etchers. Flanagan eventually returned to practicing architecture, associating with various firms until he retired in the mid-1960s. He died in New York City in 1969.
Format
Manuscript Manuscript/Archive
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Hathi Trust